Sensoji Temple

One of the most popular attractions in Asakusa is the ancient Buddhist temple, Sensoji. It is Tokyo’s oldest temple and one of its most significant.

Sensoji Temple
Asakusa
Sensoji Temple
Sensoji

The legend says that in the year 628 AD, two brothers fished a statue of Kannon, the Goddess of Mercy, out of the Sumida River. The chief of their village decided to enshrine it and build a small temple in its honor.

Sensoji Temple
Sensoji Temple

The temple was completed in 645 AD.

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Large Lantern

The main hall, pagoda, and gates are illuminated until 11:00pm. This particular temple and surrounding shopping streets get very crowded during daytime, but it was quiet and calm while we walked around the temple grounds at night.

Sensoji Temple
Entrance
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Fountain Statue

The temple is known to bring good luck for almost anything – health, relationships, school, etc.

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Sensoji Temple
Thunder Gate
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White Lanterns
Sensoji Temple
Bad Fortune Rack
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Hozomon Gate

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Sensoji is also known for for its fortunes. Visitors have the opportunity to buy omikuji (paper fortune) for 100 yen which is about one dollar. The fortunes are inside numbered drawers.

Sensoji Temple
Fortune Drawers
Sensoji Temple
Directions

Once you pay 100 yen, pick up the container of sticks and shake it a few times.

Sensoji Temple
Shake

A numbered stick will come out and you match that number to the drawer.

Sensoji Temple
Match the Number

Open the drawer and read your fortune.

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Read Your Fortune

If you happen to get a bad fortune, you should tie it to the rack. There are supposedly more kyo (bad luck) fortunes at Sensoji compared to other temples or shrines. So consider yourself very lucky if you get a good one!

Sensoji Temple
Tie Bad Fortunes

We really enjoyed our day in Asakusa. It was a nice way to see traditional Japanese culture in Tokyo.

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It was time to eat something. We walked back to the station and took the train to Shibuya for a unique sushi dinner.

Sensoji Temple
Sensoji Pagoda

Sensoji Temple
2 Chome-3-1 Asakusa
Taitล, Tokyo 111-0032, Japan
+81 3-3842-0181
Website

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Author: Desiree

Desired Tastes is a Food and Travel Blog written by Desiree, a food enthusiast from New Jersey who just wants to see the world and eat good food.

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