Golden Gai (Part 1)

It was our final night in Tokyo before heading to Kyoto the next morning and we couldn’t possibly leave the bright bustling city without checking out the retro-style alleys and tiny bars of Golden Gai!

Before heading to the “Golden District”, we went our separate ways for dinner. I stopped by a restaurant near our hotel for some shochu (Japanese distilled liquor) and gyoza (pan-fried dumplings).

Golden Gai, Part One
Shinjuku
Golden Gai, Part One
Spider-Man
Golden Gai, Part One
Tempting
Golden Gai, Part One
Run! It’s Godzilla!
Golden Gai, Part One
Small Eateries
Golden Gai, Part One
Quick Dinner
Golden Gai, Part One
Counter
Golden Gai, Part One
Beef Bowl
Golden Gai, Part One
Shochu
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Gyoza

My sister and I eventually met back up and headed to Golden Gai. The small area in Shinjuku contains narrow alleyways bursting with unique tiny bars. Most of them can accommodate no more than 10 people making them super intimate and personal spaces to enjoy a few drinks and meet new people.

Golden Gai, Part One
Golden Gai

After the second World War, Tokyo was on a mission to recover and launched a major redevelopment project. So while the city built new highrises and shopping centers, Golden Gai is one of the rare areas that was left untouched. It remains as it did then, back to Showa-era Tokyo.

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The area is world famous for its nightlife and many tourists and locals come to drink until the wee hours of the morning. It’s filled with all kinds of bars and each one has its own unique appeal like outlandish decor, karaoke, or a signature drink.

Golden Gai, Part One
Tiny Bars

The majority of the bars have a small cover to pay. Many bars are set in their ways and will only accept regulars. No gaijin (foreigner) here. The locals-only bar are fairly easy to spot, they’ll have their doors closed and the exterior is simple with no signs.

Most of the bars are foreign-friendly though and have signs outside that say so and offer English menus. If you’re not sure, it’s worth a shot to peek your head in and see if you get a smile from the owner and customers. The worst thing that can happen is that they tell you there’s no room.

Golden Gai, Part One

It was pretty overwhelming and I didn’t know which bar to stop by, but I heard that Kenzo’s Bar was a must-try.

Golden Gai, Part One
Kenzo’s Bar

Behind the leopard print door was a narrow steep staircase.

Golden Gai, Part One
Upstairs

We walked up to the small room with a table taking up the majority of it that could fit maybe 6 people.

Golden Gai, Part One

We sat at the two leopard print chairs at the bar where Kenzo greeted us. He was wearing a leopard print shirt and jacket. The walls were painted in leopard print. I think you get the theme here. Kenzo asked what we wanted to drink. I went with a beer.

We sat at the two seats at the tiny bar where Kenzo greeted us
Cheers, Kenzo!

Sitting at the table was a local university student, a couple from Spain, and a French guy who moved to Japan for work who met up with a couple of his friends.

Golden Gai, Part One

Golden Gai, Part One

I wasn’t kidding when I said these bars are tiny. You’re sitting should-to-shoulder with people, so enjoy your drink and get to know one another.

Golden Gai, Part One
Sapporo Beer

We ended up staying at Kenzo’s for a while.

Golden Gai, Part One

I loved Golden Gai. I loved the energy of it, the intimate bars, and how you can enjoy a drink with so many different people from all over the world. I knew I would have to come back before flying back home.

Golden Gai, Part One

I could have stayed all night, but it was time to get some rest. We were heading to Kyoto tomorrow!

Golden Gai, Part One


Golden Gai
1 Kabukicho
Shinjuku, Tokyo, 160-0021
Japan, 〒160-0021
Tōkyō-to, Shinjuku-ku, Kabukichō, 1 Chome−1
新宿区歌舞伎町1丁目

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Author: Desiree

Desired Tastes is a Food and Travel Blog written by Desiree, a food enthusiast from New Jersey who just wants to see the world and eat good food.

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