Gyeongbokgung Palace

Before making our way to the Palace, we stopped by The National Folk Museum of Korea for a bit. Located within the grounds of Gyeongbokgung Palace, the museum uses replicas of historical objects to illustrate the history of traditional life of the Korean people.

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Carved Wooden Poles
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The National Folk Museum of Korea

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Chinese Zodiac – Ox

Built in 1395, Gyeongbokgung Palace was the main royal palace of the Joseon dynasty. Located in northern Seoul, it is the largest of the Five Grand Palaces. Gyeongbokgung served as the home of Kings of the Joseon dynasty, the Kings’ households, and the government of Joseon.

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Palace Grounds

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Geunjeongjeon is the throne hall where the king formally granted audiences to his officials, gave declarations of national importance, and greeted foreign envoys and ambassadors.

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Geunjeongjeon Hall

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The stone-paved courtyard is lined with two rows of rank stones, called pumgyeseoks, indicating where the court officials are to stand according to their ranks.

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Geunjeongmun is located directly to the south of Geunjeongjeon. It’s the main gate to the courtyard and to Geunjeongjeon. The gate is divided into three separate aisles, and only the king was allowed to walk through the center.

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Geunjeongmun

In the early 20th century, the majority of the palace was systematically destroyed by Imperial Japan. Since then, the walled palace complex is gradually being reconstructed to its original form.

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In ancient times, the royal guards of Joseon Dynasty performed the given task by guarding the Gwanghwamun Gate. Since 1469, the ceremony has taken place and its record has been consulted for the present reenactment ceremony.

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Royal Guards

The reenactment of the original ceremony began in 1996.

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Royal Guard Changing Ceremony

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Today, the palace is said to be the most beautiful and grandest of all five palaces. It also houses the National Palace Museum of Korea and the National Folk Museum within the premises of the complex.

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Gwanghwamun Gate

The National Folk Museum of Korea
37 Samcheong-ro, Jongno-gu
Seoul, South Korea
Website
– Open All Year Round

Gyeongbokgung Palace
161 Sajik-ro, Sejongno, Jongno-gu
Seoul, South Korea
Website
– Closed on Tuesdays

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Author: Desiree

Desired Tastes is a Food and Travel Blog written by Desiree, a food enthusiast from New Jersey who just wants to see the world and eat good food.

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